Boston Common Reflects on Pope Francis’s Historic Call to Action

As one of the world’s great spiritual leaders, Pope Francis’s magisterial and historic call for action, expressed in Laudato Si’, not only continues the Catholic tradition of advocating for peace and justice, but also broadens the appeal for structural transformation to all of humanity.

Like many other faith leaders, Francis squarely rejects the argument that there is a contradiction between working to end poverty and protecting our planet. And with breathtaking simplicity, he cuts through the fog of confusion and timidity to demand clarity, courage, and action.

The Pope’s words are injecting a much needed sense of moral and economic urgency about moving swiftly to a low carbon economy that protects both the planet and the poor. We are excited to renew our efforts to work for climate justice in response to his call.

Working with other faith communities, many Catholic organizations have spent years working diligently to move our economic system towards justice and sustainability.   We have been honored to work hand-in-hand with them, structuring portfolios, engaging corporations, and advocating for principles that have steadily altered many industries.  We are delighted that the Pope’s powerful statement so clearly upholds and endorses this tradition of leadership.

Since the founding of Boston Common Asset Management, we have worked diligently to incorporate the values of our clients into the prudent management of their assets.   We built the firm on the conviction that corporate managers who, in addition to solid business practice, maintained strong commitments to human rights, environmental protection, and other fundamental principles would prove to be the best long-term investments for both moral and financial reasons.  We are pleased that this philosophy is now spreading throughout the capital markets. The Pope has summoned us to a great work – and we welcome the chance, with all of our clients and partners, to play our part.

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